CityLink

Entries for October 2009

29
One-stop early voting for 2009
One-stop early voting for 2009 municipal elections began Thursday, October 15, 2009 and ends Saturday, October 31, 2009. Election day is Tuesday, November 3, 2009. For more information visit the BOE website. www.co.cabarrus.nc.us
 
 
After 8 is too Late! Please trick or treat before 8:00 p.m. 8 Reasons after 8 is too late!

1. After 8 Is Too Late -  By going out before 8:00 p.m. children are safer and more visible to vehicle traffic and other pedestrians. CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) indicates that the risk for childhood pedestrian deaths and injuries is higher on Halloween evening when compared with all other evenings.

2. After 8 Is Too Late - Children want to get as many treats as possible, so in going from house to house children are likely to cross mid-street rather than crossing at intersections with stop signs and traffic signals in place. Daylight helps to decrease chances of pedestrian-vehicle accidents, going out before 8:00 p.m. will help to further decrease that chance!
 
 3. After 8 Is Too Late Older children tend to trick or treat later in the evening and are likely not supervised by adults, going out before 8:00 p.m. may be a more enjoyable experience for younger children!

4.  After 8 Is Too Late - Giving out treats before 8:00 p.m. is safer for those giving out treats.

5.  After 8 Is Too Late -  Turn off your porch light at 8:00 p.m. to deter people from approaching your house for treats.

6. After 8 Is Too Late -  Darkness makes it difficult for children and adults to notice other risks such as animals, slippery leaves, fences, toys and other items left in the yard.

7. After 8 Is Too Late - Not everyone is out to have clean fun on Halloween, some are out for mischief which tends to occur in the later evening hours.

8. After 8 Is Too Late - 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. is the Candy Crawl in Downtown Concord on Friday, October 30th! You don’t want to miss this early and free event!

2009-2010 Leaf Collection Dates

If your garbage collection day is Monday,  your leaves will be  collected: October 12-16, November 16-19, December 28-31

If your garbage collection day is Tuesday, your leaves will be collected: October 19-23, November 20-25, January 4-8

If your garbage collection day is Wednesday, your leaves will be collected: October 26-30, November 30-December 4, January 11-15

If your garbage collection day is Thursday, your leaves will be  collected: November 2-6, December 7-11, January 19-22

If your garbage collection day is Friday, your leaves will be collected: November 9-13, December 14-18, January 25-29
Place loose leaves at curbside by 7 a.m. the Monday of your scheduled collection week so crews can remain on schedule. Keep loose leaves away from storm drains, mail boxes, and parked cars. Leaves must be free of tree/shrub limbs or foreign objects.


This schedule is subject to change due to weather delays and equipment breakdown.  Contact the Customer Care Center or check our website for updates.  Receive timely notifications by telephone, cell phone, and e-mail. 

*No loose leaf collection is scheduled on City observed holidays including Thanksgiving (November 26-27), Christmas (December 24-25), New Year’s Day (Friday, January 1, 2010), and Martin Luther King’s Birthday (Monday, January 18, 2010)

Sign up now for Connect-CTY on the City’s website Check the City’s website for more information.  www.concordnc.gov

Customer Care Center 704-920-5555  Monday – Friday 7 a.m.—6 p.m.

Upcoming Meetings
Public hearings Held in the Municipal Building, 26 Union Street, S.

11/10/2009 at 6:00 p.m. Special Planning and Zoning Commission Meeting
11/13/2009 at 6:00 p.m. City Council Meeting
11/17/2009 at 6:00 p.m. Planning and Zoning Commission Meeting
11/19/2009 at 7:00 p.m. Historic Commission Meeting
11/24/2009 at 6:00 p.m. Board of Adjustment Meeting

 
The City of Concord will host the 12th Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony Friday, November 20, from 6 - 8 p.m.
 
The ceremony will be held on Market Street in downtown Concord.
Join Santa Claus, the Mayor and City Council Members as we light the City’s
Christmas Tree.
 
Irvin Elementary School, Cox Mill Elementary School and Gary Gilmore will perform during the ceremony.
 
 The public is invited to enjoy free trolley rides, Kid Zone with Santa’s Village, trackless train, crafts, and
 visit with Santa Claus.
 
The trolley rides are from 5-7 p.m.
We hope to see you and your families at the ceremony as we kick off the holiday
season.
FIREWORKS START AT 7:30 P.M.  Sponsored by  CMC-NorthEast
 
22
One-stop early voting for 2009
One-stop early voting for 2009 municipal elections began Thursday, October 15, 2009 and ends Saturday, October 31, 2009. Election day is Tuesday, November 3, 2009. For more information visit the BOE website.
www.co.cabarrus.nc.us
 
Candy Crawl
October 30th 3:00-5:00p.m.
Downtown Concord
 
The event is free to the public, Trick or Treating with the Downtown Concord Merchants between 3 & 5 pm. For more information about this event, call Concord Downtown Development Corporation at (704) 784-4208
 
City of Concord Featured in New Classroom Resource
 
CHAPEL HILL, NC — Local teachers and students reading the third edition of Local Government in North Carolina might notice some familiar faces. Concord is one of approximately 40 North Carolina localities featured in photos featured throughout the textbook.
 
Available online as a free downloadable PDF, Local Government in North Carolina provides an overview of the structure and operations of local government. To access the PDF, visit www.civics.org/lgnc/.
 
The author of the book is Gordon P. Whitaker, professor of public administration and government at the School of Government at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The book was published by the North Carolina City and County Management Association and the School of Government with funding from the International City/County Management Association’s Fund for Professional Management.
 
The book’s content is designed to complement the state’s 10th grade Civics and Economics curriculum, but it is a useful resource for anyone, young or old, seeking to learn more about local government. One purpose of the book is to encourage readers to play an active role in their own communities and to be personally involved in maintaining an effective government.

The City of Concord will host the 12th Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony
 Friday, November 20, from 6 - 8 p.m.
 
The ceremony will be held on Market Street in downtown Concord.
Join Santa Claus, the Mayor and City Council Members as we light the City’s
Christmas Tree.
 
Irvin Elementary School, Cox Mill Elementary School and Gary Gilmore will perform during the ceremony.
 
 The public is invited to enjoy free trolley rides, Kid Zone with Santa’s Village, trackless train, crafts, and
 visit with Santa Claus.
 
The trolley rides are from 5-7 p.m.
We hope to see you and your families at the ceremony as we kick off the holiday
season.
FIREWORKS START AT 7:30 P.M. Sponsored by CMC-NorthEast
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recycle Used Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs!
Recycling turns materials that would otherwise become waste into valuable resources. At the very heart, recycling conserves our natural resources; it saves money, creates jobs, eliminates waste in landfills, reduces harm to the environment, protects human health and saves energy.
 
Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) contain trace amounts of mercury and should be recycled in order to keep mercury from contaminating our environment. CFLs consume up to 75% less energy because they operate at lower temperatures and they last up to 10 times longer than incandescent light bulbs.
 
Ironically, CFLs present an opportunity to prevent mercury from entering our environment, where it can affect human health. The highest source of mercury pollution comes from burning fossil fuels such as coal, the most common fuel source used in the U.S. to produce electricity. Since CFLs utilize less energy to operate, the EPA estimates a power plant will emit 10 mg of mercury to produce the electricity to run an incandescent light bulb, compared to only 2.4 mg of mercury to run a CFL for the same time. Of course, the key to all of this is to recycle CFLs at the end of its life to prevent releases into the environment.
 
Beginning October 1, 2009, used CFLs can be taken to following locations for recycling:
Governmental Center
Human Services Center
Concord Library
Kannapolis Library
Mt. Pleasant Library
Harrisburg Library
(Please note that the Household Hazardous Waste Facility already accepts used CFLs)
 
The following restrictions apply: 
The CFL must be whole when delivered. No broken bulbs will be accepted.
It’s recommended that the used CFL be placed in a zip lock plastic bag. The above listed locations will provide zip lock bag if needed.
No fluorescent tubes of any size will be accepted. (They can be taken to the Household Hazardous Waste Facility as well as the used CFLs).
 
 
2009-2010 Leaf Collection Dates
 
If your garbage collection day is Monday,  your leaves will be  collected: October 12-16, November 16-19, December 28-31
 
If your garbage collection day is Tuesday, your leaves will be collected: October 19-23, November 20-25, January 4-8
 
If your garbage collection day is Wednesday, your leaves will be collected: October 26-30, November 30-December 4, January 11-15
 
If your garbage collection day is Thursday, your leaves will be  collected: November 2-6, December 7-11, January 19-22
 
If your garbage collection day is Friday, your leaves will be collected: November 9-13, December 14-18, January 25-29
Place loose leaves at curbside by 7 a.m. the Monday of your scheduled collection week so crews can remain on schedule. Keep loose leaves away from storm drains, mail boxes, and parked cars. Leaves must be free of tree/shrub limbs or foreign objects.
This schedule is subject to change due to weather delays and equipment breakdown.  Contact the Customer Care Center or check our website for updates.  Receive timely notifications by telephone, cell phone, and e-mail. 
 
Sign up now for Connect-CTY on the City’s website Check the City’s website for more information.  www.concordnc.gov
 
Customer Care Center 704-920-5555  Monday – Friday 7 a.m.—6 p.m.
*No loose leaf collection is scheduled on City observed holidays including Thanksgiving (November 26-27), Christmas (December 24-25), New Year’s Day (Friday, January 1, 2010), and Martin Luther King’s Birthday (Monday, January 18, 2010)

Concord Weekly Update

16

The Concord Weekly Update found on the front page under the bulletin board heading features to following news: Concord Weekly Update


 

Dogs Day Out Festival

Saturday, October 24 - 11:00 am - 2:00 p.m.

Les Myers Park - 338 Lawndale Avenue, SW in Concord

 

Doggie Fun Zone, Contests (Obedience Contest at 11:45; Talent Contest at 12:15; Costume Contest at 1:15), Pet Photos, Information Booths, Vendor Booths, Veterinarian Village, Food, K9 Demos & MORE!

 
Owners must show proof of current rabies vaccination before entrance to festival.  Dogs must be on 6' non-retractable leash.  Sign up for contests at Paws Headquarters at the festival.
 
Thanks for our sponsors: Foster Animal Hospital, PA, WalMart, Purina, Cabarrus Animal Hospital, PA, South Ridge Veterinary Hospital, Animal Care Clinic, Swiftdogz Canine Services, Auxiliary Power & Controls, Inc., South Gate Masonry and Lumber
 
For more information, call 704-920-5600.
 

One-stop early voting for 2009 municipal elections

After 8 is too Late! Please trick or treat before 8:00 p.m


 

09
The Concord Weekly News Update features the following news:

 

 
2009-2010 Leaf Collection Dates Announced
 
After 8 is too Late! Please trick or treat before 8:00 p.m.8 Reasons after 8 is too late!
 
Seamone Recognized with Lifetime Achievement Award
 
Dogs Day Out Festival Saturday, October 24 - 11:00 am - 2:00 pm
 

The City of Concord will host the 12th Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony Friday, November 20, from 6 - 8 p.m.
 
What is the 2010 Census and Why is it Important?
 
Local Neighborhood Named Community of the Year
 
09


1. Presented the ElectriCities Public Power Lifetime Achievement Award to Bill Seamone and several “Awards of Excellence” to City departments. The North Carolina ElectriCities organization presented its prestigious Livetime Achievement award to retired Concord Electric Systems Director Bill Seamone. Seamone is a recognized leader among Public Power communities and retired from the City in 2009 after 41 years of service. The City of Concord was also awarded "Awards of Excellence" for their achievements in Communications, Customer Service, Training, Economic Development, and Energy Efficiency. Graham Edwards, the CEO of ElectriCities presented these awards. 

2. Presented a Certificate of Appreciation to Wilson (Bill) Cone recognizing his 6 years of service to the City of Concord Planning and Zoning Commission. Former Commission Chair Wilson (Bill) Cone completed his second consecutive term on June 30th, 2009.  The City Council acknowledged him for his outstanding leadership as well as his years of service.
 
3. Presented the Quarterly Shining Star Award to Sandra Villanueva of the Concord Police Department.   Sandra was recognized for going above and beyond in customer service for her assistance in helping a citizen get to work when he did not have adequate means of transportation to do so.
 
4. Declared the Council seat for District 7 vacant and adopted procedures for filling the vacant seat. With the resignation of Council Member Grimes the District 7 seat is now vacant. City Council adopted a process for taking applications from interested persons to fill the seat. Information on the process is available on the City’s web site and from the City Clerk’s office.
 
5. Entered into a Municipal Agreement with the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) for the planning and construction of the realignment of Morehead Road (SR-1300) from east of US 29 to west of Performance Dr., NW in Concord, North Carolina. The proposed realignment of Morehead Rd. is one part of a coordinated effort between the City of Concord and the NCDOT to address critical roadway safety and efficiency needs. Concord is partnering with NCDOT to pay for construction and all necessary permits.
 
6. Authorized the Electric and Transportation departments to accept parts and materials from the North Carolina Department of Transportation. NCDOT and the City of Kannapolis are working together to remove thirty-three forty-foot wood poles, 6,500 feet of twelve-strand fiber optic cable, and all associated hardware from Kannapolis Parkway. NCDOT has offered the materials to the City of Concord free of charge in exchange for time and labor for removal. The items have value of almost $20,000 and can benefit the overall operations of the Electric Department and Traffic Signal Division.
 
7. Received a report concerning the continuance of the Checkered Flag Route that provides transit service from the speedway to downtown Concord. The Checkered Flag Route was implemented last year to provide transit service from Lowe’s Motor Speedway to downtown Concord and Concord Mills Mall, and points in between. This approval continues a similar level of service for the October race period.
 
9. Received and adopted the final recommended trail alignment for the Rocky River Greenway-Phase One. This action authorizes the design and permitting for Phase 1A only of the Greenway so that plans will be available to seek financial support for eventual construction in the area near Weddington Road and the Concord Convention Center.
 
10. Voted to ask NCDOT to consider alternate alignments to the portion of Pitts School Road impacted by the widening of I-85. NCDOT is taking comments on the proposed design of the I-85 widening project until October 15, 2009. The Council expressed its support for the widening as Concord has lobbied for it for decades.  Council adopted a motion that encourages NCDOT to consider alternative alignments for Pitts School Road at the intersection with Poplar Tent Road that would reduce the impact on the farming operations of the Barbee and Bonds properties.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
05
We need your help.
 
Your community is currently engaged in a planning process to become less vulnerable to disasters caused by natural hazards, and your participation is important to us!
                           
Municipal Departments are working together to update the City’s Hazard Mitigation Plan. The purpose of this Plan is to identify and assess our community’s natural hazard risks (such as flooding, winter storms, tornadoes and wildfires) and determine how to best minimize or manage those risks. Upon completion, the Plan will become presented to council for adoption and then submitted to the North Carolina Division of Emergency Management and Federal Emergency Management Agency for review and approval.

This survey questionnaire provides an opportunity for you to share your opinions and participate in the mitigation planning process. The information you provide will help us better understand your hazard concerns and can lead to mitigation activities that should help lessen the impact of future hazard events.


If you have any questions regarding this survey, or would like to learn about more ways you can participate in the development of our Hazard Mitigation Plan, please contact Jim Sells with Concord Division of Emergency Management at (704) 920-5528 or by e-mail at sellsj@concordnc.gov.

 

Send the Survey back to Jim Sells at sellsj@concordnc.gov.

 
1.        What neighborhood do you live in?
 
2.        Have you ever experienced or been impacted by a disaster
            Yes      No
 
3.        How concerned are you about the possibility of our community being     impacted    by a disaster?
            Extremely Concerned   Somewhat Concerned Not Concerned
 
4.         Please select the one hazard that you think is the highest threat to your  neighborhood.
           
            Dam failure                   Tornado/Wind Storm                Lightning
            Drought                        Hail                                          Major Urban Fire
            Earthquake                   Hazardous Materials                 Severe Winter Storm
            Erosion             Hurricane                                 Terrorism
            Extreme Heat               Land Subsidene                       
            Flood  
 
            Other, please explain:
 
5.         Please select the one hazard you think is the second highest threat to your          neighborhood.
 
            Dam failure                   Tornado/Wind Storm                Lightning
            Drought                        Hail                                          Major Urban Fire
            Earthquake                   Hazardous Materials                 Severe Winter Storm
            Erosion             Hurricane                                 Terrorism
            Extreme Heat               Land Subsidene                       
            Flood  
 
            Other, please explain:
 
6.         Is there another hazard not listed above that you think is a wide-scale threat to  your neighborhood?
                        Yes      No
 
            If yes, please explain:
 
 
7.         Is your home located in a floodplain?
                        Yes      No       I don’t know
 
8.         Do you have flood insurance?
                        Yes      No       I don’t know
 
9.         If you answered “No” to Question 8, why not?
 
            Not in a flood plain
            Too expensive
            Not necessary because it never floods
            Not necessary because I’m elevated or other wise protected.
            Never really considered it.
 
            Other, please explain:
 
10.       Have you taken any actions to make your home or neighborhood more resistant to        natural hazards?
                        Yes      No
 
            If yes, please explain
 
11.       Are you interested in making your home or neighborhood more resistant to        natural hazards?
                        Yes      No
 
12        What is the most effective way for you to receive information about how to make your home and neighborhood more resistant to natural hazards?
 
            Newspaper
            Television
            Radio
            Internet
            Mail
            Public workshops/meetings
            Neighborhood meetings
            Other, please explain:
 
13.       In your opinion, what are some steps your local government could take to          eliminate the risk of future natural hazard damages in your neighborhood?
 
 
 
14        Are there any other issues regarding the reduction of risk and loss associated with          natural hazards or disasters in the community that you think are important?
 
 
 
 
15.       A number of community-wide activities can reduce our risk from natural hazards.          In general, these activities fall into one of the following six broad categories.          Please tell us how important you think each one is to your neighborhood for us to consider pursuing.
 
 
Very Important
Somewhat Important
Not Important
Prevention, Administrative or regulatory actions that influence the way land is developed and buildings are built. Examples include planning and zoning, building codes, open space preservation, and floodplain regulations.
 
 
 
Property Protection, Actions that involve the modification of existing buildings to protect them from a hazard or removal from the hazard area. Examples include acquisition, relocation, elevation, structural retrofits, and storm shutters.
 
 
 
Natural Resource Protection: Actions that, in addition to minimizing hazard losses, also preserve or restore the functions of natural systems. Examples include: floodplain protection, habitat preservation, slope stabilization, riparian buffers, and forest management.
 
 
 
Structural Projects: Actions intended to lessen the impact of a hazard by modifying the natural progression of the hazard. Examples include dams, levees, seawalls, detention/retention basins, channel modification, retaining walls and storm sewers.
 
 
 
Public Education and Awareness:  Actions to inform citizens about hazards and the techniques they can use to protect themselves and their property. Examples include outreach projects, school education programs, library materials and demonstration events.
 
 
 
 
16. In your opinion, what sources of funding should used to support natural hazard mitigation activities?